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Manarinorange
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Default Jun 10, 2024 at 06:47 PM
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I have horrible anxiety. I'm on a lot of meds for it but they have quit working. I know some grouning techniques that help some. I'm just here to receive and give support. So hello!
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Default Jun 10, 2024 at 08:00 PM
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@Manarinorange welcome to MSF. I am sorry that you have troubling anxiety. That must be rough.

Grounding helps me too like following the breath and some youtube videos like this one


Jon Kabat Zinn has a lot of nice videos. If you want to try this 5 minute turning within


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Default Jun 10, 2024 at 09:12 PM
  #3
Welcome, @Manarinorange! I like Box Breathing for anxiety.

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Default Jun 10, 2024 at 09:38 PM
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Welcome!
I listen to 432mhz on YouTube.

I also like Tibetan monks chanting.

There's many good guided meditation.

At one time I wore a rubber band I would snap on my wrist. Then find a red object, orange, yellow etc

Practice breathing before you get anxious

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Default Jun 11, 2024 at 03:43 PM
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Thank all of you for responding! I appreciate it and don't feel so alone!
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Default Jun 12, 2024 at 01:49 AM
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Anyone here also struggle with agoraphobia?
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Default Jun 12, 2024 at 06:02 AM
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Anyone here also struggle with agoraphobia?
I had a form of agoraphobia, but it differed slightly from the usual experience. Being in the military, specific incidents led me to avoid wide open spaces as a precaution against snipers. If you're unfamiliar, it's not a topic for lengthy discussion here. When exposed to vast open areas, I felt anxious and vulnerable.

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Default Jun 12, 2024 at 11:49 AM
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Anyone here also struggle with agoraphobia?
I struggled with pretty severe agoraphobia about 15 years ago. My DD was a toddler, and I was exhausted and dealing with anxiety. My mind was so keyed up and reactive that leaving home was nearly impossible- being at home was bad enough. It was a challenge just to leave the house and walk down the driveway to get the mail.

Dr. Claire Weekes wrote a book titled Simple Effective Treatment of Agoraphobia that changed things for me. Unfortunately, it's out of print and can be a difficult book to find for a reasonable price, but Dr. Weekes understood that agoraphobics can have difficulty getting treatment, so geared her approach to a guided, self-help model. Some people refer to her as the OG of cognitive behavioral therapy, which is what her method is.

She also has another good book, that's a little more readily available, titled Hope and Help for Your Nerves.

CBT is a slow and steady process, but can be effective. Fifteen years later, I can walk out the door and go pretty much anywhere without anxiety or a second thought. I had very noticeable improvement within about six months of starting, and by year 8 had developed a relatively high anxiety/stress tolerance. There is hope.

Sending lots of hugs and prayers your way.

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Default Jun 12, 2024 at 02:50 PM
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I struggled with pretty severe agoraphobia about 15 years ago. My DD was a toddler, and I was exhausted and dealing with anxiety. My mind was so keyed up and reactive that leaving home was nearly impossible- being at home was bad enough. It was a challenge just to leave the house and walk down the driveway to get the mail.

Dr. Claire Weekes wrote a book titled Simple Effective Treatment of Agoraphobia that changed things for me. Unfortunately, it's out of print and can be a difficult book to find for a reasonable price, but Dr. Weekes understood that agoraphobics can have difficulty getting treatment, so geared her approach to a guided, self-help model. Some people refer to her as the OG of cognitive behavioral therapy, which is what her method is.

She also has another good book, that's a little more readily available, titled Hope and Help for Your Nerves.

CBT is a slow and steady process, but can be effective. Fifteen years later, I can walk out the door and go pretty much anywhere without anxiety or a second thought. I had very noticeable improvement within about six months of starting, and by year 8 had developed a relatively high anxiety/stress tolerance. There is hope.

Sending lots of hugs and prayers your way.

Thank you so much for the information! Yes I'm going to ask my therapist to do some cbt with me since it can help many of my ailments. I'm on medicaid and finding therapists that stick around once they fill like they have enough experience. But the one I have now has stuck around. I've only been seeing her once a month, but I'm going to see if we can do phone appointments bc I know that she can do those and start working on cbt weekly.
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Default Jun 13, 2024 at 09:01 PM
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-snip-
Dr. Claire Weekes wrote a book titled Simple Effective Treatment of Agoraphobia that changed things for me. Unfortunately, it's out of print and can be a difficult book to find for a reasonable price,-snip-
That book is available online at Open Library. You can read it for free after a free registration:
Simple effective treatment of agoraphobia by Claire Weekes | Open Library

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Default Jun 19, 2024 at 03:54 PM
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I'm going to be going to a place I'm not used to going. I get so anxious when I have to go to places I've never been to before. Do any of you have any techniques i could use?
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Default Jun 19, 2024 at 04:24 PM
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I'm going to be going to a place I'm not used to going. I get so anxious when I have to go to places I've never been to before. Do any of you have any techniques i could use?
Do you have any close friends who could possibly go with you? This has helped me in the past. My friends and I are thick as thieves. If you need them, they make time, as I always did for them. My psychiatrist's solution to this is a pound of Xanax, which is not very conducive to driving. Some find meditation helpful, or do something you find very relaxing and enjoy before you go—music, favorite movie, whatever.

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Default Jun 19, 2024 at 08:49 PM
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@Manarinorange, do you think this is part of the agoraphobia?

I had this issue the first time I drove myself to a new school. It provoked a lot of anxiety in me. I was nauseous and skipped breakfast, plus I had dry heaves before getting into the car. This was over 40 years ago.

Today, I would use something like Google Maps "Street View" to get familiar with the area I'd be traveling to. And if I had to be there at a specific time (like for a job interview), I'd probably make a "practice trip" a few days before to rehearse the trip without the pressure of getting there at a certain time. And, I'd allow for plenty of time for the real trip so I do not have the anxiety compounded by the fear of getting there late.

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Last edited by SquarePegGuy; Jun 19, 2024 at 08:50 PM.. Reason: fix the mention link
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Default Yesterday at 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by SquarePegGuy View Post
@Manarinorange, do you think this is part of the agoraphobia?

I had this issue the first time I drove myself to a new school. It provoked a lot of anxiety in me. I was nauseous and skipped breakfast, plus I had dry heaves before getting into the car. This was over 40 years ago.

Today, I would use something like Google Maps "Street View" to get familiar with the area I'd be traveling to. And if I had to be there at a specific time (like for a job interview), I'd probably make a "practice trip" a few days before to rehearse the trip without the pressure of getting there at a certain time. And, I'd allow for plenty of time for the real trip so I do not have the anxiety compounded by the fear of getting there late.
It might be the agoraphobia. The problem with using Google maps or GPS is that it will tell me to get on the freeway, and I can't do that. They make me too anxious. Doing trips a couple of times beforehand is a good idea too. But it's is a long way and uses a lot of gas. I was just hoping for some things to say to myself or I might take a cotton ball with lavender essential oil on it.
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Default Yesterday at 08:30 PM
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